Nvision Blog

Why Is LASIK More Affordable Than Contact Lens Wear?

Posted on November 18, 2019

You've told yourself you couldn't have LASIK, even though you desperately want to stop wearing contact lenses all the time. You think you'll save money by sticking with the tried and true.

Do the math, and you might discover that you're paying more for contacts than you would for a LASIK surgery.

 

How Much Does LASIK Cost?

During a LASIK procedure, your doctor numbs your eyes, creates a corneal flap, and amends the tissue within your eye with a laser. The flap is replaced, and you're sent home with drops to help you heal. The procedure is sophisticated, and it can come with a high price tag.

Analysts say LASIK can cost between $1,000 to more than $3,000 per eye. That price includes your:

  • Eye exam. Your doctor needs to assess your vision loss and eye health before the work begins.
  • LASIK procedure. The doctor's time, the equipment, anesthesia, and all other details are included in this price.
  • Post-operative care. Drops you need to heal your eyes and your return visits with the doctor are included here.
  • Follow-up care. If you don't achieve the vision correction you want, a second surgery can be included in the fee.

Bargain-basement prices often come with loopholes. Your follow-up care might cost extra, for example, or you won't get a second surgery for free. You'll need to understand the price carefully before you sign on.

How Much Do Contacts Cost?

You don't need surgery to wear contacts, but you do need a special type of eye exam. And you'll need to pay for both your contacts and their upkeep. This is an expense you'll always see in your budget.

In 2012, researchers dug into eye health prices all across the country. These are some of the fees you can expect to pay as a person who wears contact lenses:

  • Contact exam: Fees range between $85 and $215.
  • Contact lenses: These fees vary widely, depending on the kind of contact you need. Expect to pay about $90 for a three-month supply.
  • Glasses exam: You'll also need glasses to wear when you're resting your eyes from your contacts. This demands a different exam. Expect to pay between $20 and $140.
  • Glasses: You'll pay between $50 and $300 or more, depending on your prescription.

You'll also need cases and solution to store your contacts when they're not in your eyes. Fees can vary, but it’s not unusual to pay $200 per year to maintain your contacts.

What About Insurance?

We use insurance policies to offset the cost of medical care and keep our expenses low. While some plans help to pay for vision care, it's rare to have full coverage. And even if you do, some of your fees won't be included in your benefits package.

LASIK is not covered by insurance plans. Officials consider this an elective procedure that you could skip by wearing glasses or contacts. It's rarely, if ever, covered.

Vision insurance programs offer benefits, but they can be lean. In one typical program, you'll get coverage for:

  • Eye exams.
  • Contact lens fittings.
  • One set of contact lenses annually.

You'll have to pay out of pocket for your glasses. And this plan won't cover the cost of your solutions and maintenance materials.

Vision insurance can be helpful, but it's rare. Analysts say just 35 percent of employers offer this kind of coverage to their employees. And Medicare doesn't cover routine eye exams at all, reporters point out.

If you don't have vision insurance, you're not alone. But it means you'll pay your bill on your own, regardless of whether you choose LASIK or contact lenses.

What's the Final Tally?

 

To determine if LASIK is truly more affordable than contact lenses, we'll have to do some comprehensive math.

We know LASIK will cost, on average, $4,000 for both eyes. That's a lifetime cost, as you won't need to repeat the experience every year.

Per year, contacts will cost:

  • $100 for an exam.
  • $300 for the lenses.
  • $200 in solution.
  • $115 for glasses (since glasses cost about $350, and they last for about three years).

That brings your yearly contacts price to $715. After about five years, you'll pay more for contacts than you would for LASIK.

References

How Much Does LASIK Cost? VSP.

How Much Do Glasses Cost? How Much Do Contacts Cost? (October 2012). Clear Health Costs.

Vision Insurance FAQ: Frame, Lens, and Contact Lens Benefits. (April 2016). VSP.

What Percentage of Companies Offer Vision Insurance? (January 2017). Zenefits.

Vision Care Lags, With Blind Spots in Insurance Coverage. (May 2018). National Public Radio.

Is LASIK Expensive?

Posted on November 18, 2019

You want to see clearly without the constant use of glasses and contacts. But as you sit at the kitchen table and crunch the numbers, you wonder if you can afford LASIK surgery.

It's true that LASIK surgery can — and often does — come with a significant price tag. But when you total up costs associated with glasses and contacts, you might find that you'll save money in the long run.

High angle view of unrecognizable mature man placing USA Dollar bills into wallet.

How Much Does LASIK Cost?

LASIK is a surgical procedure. Doctors use specialized (and expensive) equipment to measure your eye and make precise cuts to reshape the surface. You need anesthesia before the cutting starts, and you need drops to help your eyes heal. All of that comes for a price.

Expect to pay about $2,200 per eye for LASIK. And that's for baseline surgery. If you're hoping to use an advanced form of the procedure — where doctors use only lasers instead of cutting your eye — experts say you should expect to pay more.

You might also see a higher cost based on:

  • Your doctor's expertise. Doctors with exceptional reputations are in high demand. They often charge more.
  • Your location. LASIK prices vary from one state to another. If you live in a spot with little LASIK surgeon competition, your rate might be higher.
  • Your aftercare. If you need a touchup surgery, and it's not covered by the original fee you paid, you'll see another bill.

Some clinics offer discounts that can bring down your total price. If you opt to pay in cash, for example, or you sign up during a slow time of year, you might see a reduction.

Woman with glasses suffering from eyestrain after long hours working on computer

How Much Do Glasses and Contacts Cost?

It's rare to walk out of an optician's office with a bill for $2,200. But your glasses and contacts can cost you more than you might think.

It's not unusual, experts say, for glasses frames to cost $500 or more. Your lens cost is tacked on, and the price can rise due to:

  • Your prescription. If you're very nearsighted, your doctor might opt to compress your lenses. That makes them lighter and easier to wear.
  • Lens coatings. Your clinic might spray materials on the outside of your lens to protect you from the sun or keep hard objects from causing scratches.
  • Bifocals. If you need additional customization to help you read, that could cost more.

An eyeglass prescription lasts for two years. Every time your eyes change, you'll need a new set of glasses. If your bill comes to $800 or more each time, that can really add up.

Contact lenses are more expensive. A box of soft contact lenses, for example, can cost about $26, experts say. You'll need a box for each eye, and they'll last you for six months. In addition to your contacts, you'll need:

  • A case. You'll use this to store your lenses when you're not wearing them. It should be replaced every time you get new lenses. And if you crack it or damage it, you'll need a new one too.
  • Cleanser. Every time you take out your contacts, you'll need to use a solution to strip proteins and bacteria from the surface. You can't run out of this product.
  • Storage solution. When you pop your lenses in a case, they'll need to swim in a liquid. This is another product you'll need in constant supply.
  • Rewetting drops. If your eyes feel dry and gritty during the day, this product can make blinking more comfortable.

All of these bottles and cases can add up to big bills every month. If you scrimp and save by buying a little less or using water instead, you could develop an eye infection. That means another trip to the doctor for help.

You Could Save Money

LASIK comes with a one-time, large medical bill. But when the surgery is complete, you might never need to buy another pair of heavy-duty, prescription glasses. That could save you thousands over the ensuing years. For many, it's a smart financial move.

References

Pros and Cons of LASIK: Are the Risks Worth the Cost? (December 2017). Michigan Health.

Are You Confused About the Cost of LASIK Eye Surgery? (March 2016). American Refractive Surgery Council.

What's It Like to Have LASIK? Patient Shares Surgery, Recovery, Cost, and More. (August 2018). Today.

How Much Do Eyeglasses Cost? Cost Helper.

How Much Do Contacts Cost? (February 2017). Bankrate.

Do LASIK Surgeons Operate on Family Members? Do They Have LASIK?

Posted on October 30, 2019

How do you know if LASIK surgeons really believe in the procedure they perform every day? Finding out if they recommend the solution to their friends and family members is a good place to start.

Researchers say that it's common for LASIK surgeons to both recommend and perform the procedure on their family members. They know a lot about the benefits of this surgery, as they often have it themselves.

Why Wouldn’t Doctors Operate on Family?


Watch medical programs like Grey's Anatomy, and you'll walk away convinced that doctors often perform surgeries on the people they love. In reality, there are guidelines about the practice. Sometimes, those rules make doctors step away from the surgery room.

Experts point out that organizations like the American Medical Association encourage doctors to stay in the waiting room when their loved ones need help. A doctor treating a loved one can struggle to:

  • Remain impartial. Serious illnesses often call for analytic decisions. That's hard to do when you're working with someone you love.
  • Deal with a crisis. During an intense surgery, a loved one can experience a complication. Surgeons must work quickly under pressure. Relationships can make that hard.
  • Maintain confidence. Worries and doubts can keep surgeons from making the right calls in a crisis.

Despite these risks, it's somewhat common for doctors to work on those they love. In a 2017 study, 76 percent of doctors said they'd performed surgery on friends and family members.

How Is LASIK Surgery Different?


When we're talking about surgeries and family, we're sometimes talking about life-and-death procedures. If someone we love has a severe bone break, a cancerous tumor, or a blocked artery, the surgical solution is serious. The surgery comes with enhanced risks. LASIK is a surgery, but the risk profile is a little different.

Doctors use finely calibrated equipment to perform LASIK procedures. They take very detailed measurements before the first cut is made. And the whole surgery is over in minutes.

It's still a surgery, but the chance that something will go catastrophically wrong is minuscule.

Doctors might choose to perform LASIK on those they love because:

  • They trust their skills. A doctor who has performed LASIK surgeries thousands of times knows the equipment inside and outside. Sending a loved one to a different surgeon can seem silly.
  • It helps with marketing. Patients trust doctors who are willing to perform LASIK on those they love. It's a vote of confidence that could help nervous patients feel safe while in surgery.
  • They believe in the surgery. Researchers say more than 90 percent of LASIK surgeons recommend the procedure to friends and family members. They know it works, and they want those they love to take advantage.
  • They understand the patient's lifestyle. Close families know one another well. LASIK surgeons may know their husbands have dry eyes in the summer, or they know their wives enjoy knitting in the winter. They can take precautions to match surgical outcomes to fit the person's lifestyle.

Doctors might also encourage family members to have LASIK because they know it works. Researchers say more than 62 percent of experts who perform LASIK have been patients at one point.

They couldn't treat their own eyes, of course. But they trusted a colleague to help them. And now, they see the results every day. They're in an exceptional position to discuss risks and benefits with those they love.

Patients have choices. There are plenty of practitioners ready to help people who want to leave a life of glasses behind. But if you know and love someone who provides this surgery, it could be a good option for you to consider.

References

Why Doctors Shouldn't Treat Family Members. (January 2012). CNN.

When You Operate on Friends and Relatives: Results of a Survey Among Surgeons. (May 2017). Medical Principles and Practice.

Do Ophthalmologists Undergo LASIK? (May 2016). The Ophthalmologist.

Eye Doctors Are LASIK Patients Too. (February 2016). American Refractive Surgery Council.

Regional Practice Administrator

Posted on October 23, 2019

NVISION Eye Centers has an immediate opening for a Regional Practice Administrator in our Sacramento area practices.

This position will oversee all operational aspects of multiple General Ophthalmology and LASIK clinics in Sacramento and surrounding areas. You will have oversight and accountability for year over year sales growth, profitability, physician relationships, teammate engagement & retention, patient satisfaction, compliance, and quality assurance.

This Leader will have direct oversight and P&L responsibility for 5-8 locations.

Essential Job Duties Will Include:

· Implement and Lead process and protocol for general ophthalmology charge capture, billing and coding best practices

· Oversight of optimizing templates for MD’s, OD’s, Technicians, and Scribes

· Train by demonstration of intimate knowledge of subject matter and “jumping in”

· Lead successful integration of multiple ophthalmology acquisitions

· Project management of key initiatives within set timeline

· Achieve Key Performance Indicators including revenue and expense targets, conversion rates, provider utilization, cancellation & no-show rates, patient satisfaction and teammate engagement and retention

· Identify and regularly meet with key stakeholders (hospital/ IPA leadership, MDs, ODs) to drive sales

· Coach and develop Executive Directors and assist with succession planning within the organization

· Daily site visits to centers (to include 5-6 annual site visits to out of state centers, more if necessary, to achieve business objectives)

· Lead monthly operations reporting calls and weekly touch bases with COO

· Participate in budget process and monitor monthly P&L

· Work with all cross functional areas and assist with ad hoc projects that arise

Job Requirements to Be Considered For This Role:

· Bachelor’s Degree from a 4 -year accredited college or university, MBA/MPH preferred

· Experience with oversight and success of one location as primary working manager.

· Experience leading multi-site health care locations with full P&L and staff accountability

· Deep knowledge of general ophthalmology operations (7+ years of experience) preferred

· 7+ years Multi site experience will be considered (Dermatology, Orthopedics, Dental, Physician Practice Management)

· Must have extensive knowledge of billing, coding, and charge entry (5+ years)

· Ability to work in a fast paced, rapidly growing environment

· Proven track record of operational success

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