We're Open! Thank You Essential Workers, Get $1500 Off Any LASIK Procedure! Read More

X

Browsing Category LASIK

Which Is Better: PRK or LASIK and Why?

Posted on February 16, 2020

Would you prefer apples or oranges? When it's time for a breakfast beverage, do you choose coffee or tea? Some choices we make are benign and based on our personal preferences. But others concern our health, and they're best made with the help of a doctor.

When you're considering refractive surgery, you'll get the option to choose between photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) or laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK).

Actually, your doctor will help you decide. And the one that's right for you will depend on a combination of eye health and lifestyle factors.

What Happens During Surgery?

Both PRK and LASIK change the way light moves through your eye. The shape of your cornea is altered, so images come into focus on the most sensitive cells in the retina. Blurring and distortion fade when your retina has access to every bit of critical information coming into the eyes.

During PRK:

  • Your eye is numbed.
  • Your doctor uses a small instrument to wipe away your top layer of corneal cells.
  • A laser reshapes the eye and brushes away irregularities.

During LASIK:

  • Your eye is numbed.
  • Your doctor cuts a layer or two of cells and pushes them aside.
  • A laser reshapes your eye.
  • The cut cells are replaced.

How Are They Similar?

PRK and LASIK are very different surgeries that require specialized equipment and a skilled practitioner. But they do share several similarities.

Both LASIK and PRK:

  • Correct common vision problems. Both surgeries can be used to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism.
  • Have a similar fee. They cost about the same, analysts say. You can expect to pay up to $5,000 for both eyes.
  • Can help you see clearly. Visual acuity scores don't shift when researchers compare the procedures. Both can help people with vision problems to see clearly and not wear glasses or contact lenses all the time.

Even though these two procedures share attributes, they are right for some people and wrong for others.

patient undergoing prk surgery

Why Choose LASIK?

Doctors say most of their patients request LASIK when they want to amend their vision. This is a well-known procedure that has the ability to restore vision with very little sacrifice.

Most people who have LASIK experience little, if any, discomfort. Your eyes might feel gritty or dry, and you might need eye drops for a few weeks as you heal. But you're likely to describe your discomfort as mild, even in the few days after surgery. That's not true of PRK.

Reporters document their experience, and they agree that LASIK isn't terribly uncomfortable. They say they felt anxious to get back into normal activities within a few days.

Reporters discussing PRK had a different experience. They discuss feeling pain for an extended period of time.

Why Choose PRK?

LASIK might be considered a superior surgical choice, as it tends to produce good results with little discomfort. But not all patients are eligible for this surgery, and some don't have a lifestyle that's right for this procedure.

During LASIK, doctors replace the tissue they cut. But it's not stitched into place. If you're hit hard enough or you jolt your body quickly enough, you can push that flap away. That's a medical emergency that could require surgery.

Experts say PRK is best for people at risk for flap displacement. You could fall into this group if you:

  • Play high-impact sports, such as football or basketball.
  • Skydive.
  • Are in the military.
  • Trim trees or otherwise participate in active gardening activities.

You might also choose PRK if you have thin corneas. Your surgeon removes less tissue with PRK, and the epithelium that's scraped away does come back. You might not be eligible for LASIK with thin corneas, but your doctor might think PRK would work just fine.

Which Is Right for You?

Your doctor can help you make a smart decision about which surgery is best for your eyes, given your health and your lifestyle. It's not a decision you can make on your own, as you don't have all the information you need without a thorough eye exam. But your doctor can help.

 

References

What's the Difference Between PRK and LASIK? Healthline.

Types of Laser Eye Surgery: Cost and Risks of PRK vs. LASIK vs. LASEK. Money Crashers.

LASIK or PRK: Know Which One Suits Your Patient. Collaborative Eye.

When Is PRK a Better Choice Than LASIK? (January 2014). Practice Update.

17 Helpful Tips for Anyone Getting LASIK or PRK Eye Surgery. (April 2018). BuzzFeed.

What Is Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK)? (September 2017). American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 

Contact Lens Complications Compared to LASIK Complications

Posted on February 16, 2020

Are contact lenses safer for your eyes? Or should you opt for LASIK instead?

If these questions keep you up at night, you’re not alone. We all want to do what’s best for our eyes. And it’s sometimes hard to parse medical jargon and get at the truth.

It’s true that LASIK is a surgery, and all similar procedures come with at least some risk. But contact lens complications are more common than those seen with LASIK.

While your doctor can help to cut your LASIK complication risk, you’ll need to adjust your contact injury rate alone. That’s not always easy.

Orthokeratology contact lenses

Contacts and Complications

Contacts are medical devices, and they're tightly regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. That organization wouldn't automatically approve something that wasn't safe.

But to keep your risk of problems as low as possible, you need to follow detailed instructions carefully. Few people do that.

In a study of contact-lens wearers, a third had a lens problem that required a trip to the doctor. That means the majority of people who wear contacts will have some sort of complication.

Most of the time, experts say, problems stem from bacteria. In some cases, infections can cause blindness. They can develop quickly, and often, they start with an innocent decision.

You might choose to:

  • Expose your contacts to water. You might rinse them under the tap, or you might wear them while swimming or showering.
  • Skip a cleaning step. You know you should clean your contacts before storing them. But you're tired, and you don’t. Bacteria can grow in just one night.
  • Reuse solutions. The liquids you need to care for contacts are expensive. But reusing solutions instead of replacing them can be dangerous.
  • Hold on to cases. You should replace your case regularly. If you hold onto it for too long, bacteria can grow.

The type of lens you use plays a role in complication rates. In one study, for example, researchers found that 86.84 percent of people wearing extended-use lenses had a problem. Only 67.85 percent of those who chose daily wear versions had the same issue.

Your doctor plays a role in the lenses you choose, but all the other complication risk factors stem from your choices. And global problem rates remain consistent over time. People don’t seem to change the way they care for contacts, even as the risks of improper contact use become clear.

lasik eye

LASIK and Complications

Every surgery comes with risks. You could have a reaction to the anesthetic drops, or the machine your doctor uses could malfunction. When you're preparing for surgery, it's easy for your mind to dream up plenty of scenarios that end with long-lasting blindness. In reality, LASIK comes with very few complications.

Industry records suggest that the LASIK complication rate sits at below 1 percent. Some people experience transient issues, such as:

  • Blurred vision.
  • Trouble with night vision.
  • Light sensitivity.
  • Mild pain or discomfort.
  • Dry eyes.

But often, these problems go away when the eye heals. It's very rare for them to persist.

Experts say LASIK technology is improving to reduce side effects. When compared to older surgeries, newer versions tend to come with fewer patient complaints. That means we can expect complication rates to drop even more.

To ensure the best outcome, you'll need to choose your surgeon carefully and work with a partner with plenty of experience and skill. You'll also need to stick to the follow-up care instructions given by your doctor. Do that, and there's no reason to expect major problems.

What Should You Do Next?

It's good to understand the risks and benefits of any medical procedure you're considering. That's true whether you're thinking about contacts or surgery.

But remember that your eyes are unique and special, and what's right for you might be different than what's right for someone else. Talk with your doctor to get the best advice on what should work for your eyes. 

References

Complications of Contact Lenses. UpToDate.

Contact Lens Risks. (September 2018). U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Prevalence of Contact Lens-Related Complications Among Wearers in Saudi Arabia. (2016). Sudanese Journal of Ophthalmology.

LASIK Complication Rate: The Latest Facts and Stats You Should Know. (October 2017). American Refractive Surgery Council.

Facts About LASIK Complications. (December 2018). American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Why Is LASIK More Affordable Than Contact Lens Wear?

Posted on November 18, 2019

You've told yourself you couldn't have LASIK, even though you desperately want to stop wearing contact lenses all the time. You think you'll save money by sticking with the tried and true.

Do the math, and you might discover that you're paying more for contacts than you would for a LASIK surgery.

 

How Much Does LASIK Cost?

During a LASIK procedure, your doctor numbs your eyes, creates a corneal flap, and amends the tissue within your eye with a laser. The flap is replaced, and you're sent home with drops to help you heal. The procedure is sophisticated, and it can come with a high price tag.

Analysts say LASIK can cost between $1,000 to more than $3,000 per eye. That price includes your:

  • Eye exam. Your doctor needs to assess your vision loss and eye health before the work begins.
  • LASIK procedure. The doctor's time, the equipment, anesthesia, and all other details are included in this price.
  • Post-operative care. Drops you need to heal your eyes and your return visits with the doctor are included here.
  • Follow-up care. If you don't achieve the vision correction you want, a second surgery can be included in the fee.

Bargain-basement prices often come with loopholes. Your follow-up care might cost extra, for example, or you won't get a second surgery for free. You'll need to understand the price carefully before you sign on.

How Much Do Contacts Cost?

You don't need surgery to wear contacts, but you do need a special type of eye exam. And you'll need to pay for both your contacts and their upkeep. This is an expense you'll always see in your budget.

In 2012, researchers dug into eye health prices all across the country. These are some of the fees you can expect to pay as a person who wears contact lenses:

  • Contact exam: Fees range between $85 and $215.
  • Contact lenses: These fees vary widely, depending on the kind of contact you need. Expect to pay about $90 for a three-month supply.
  • Glasses exam: You'll also need glasses to wear when you're resting your eyes from your contacts. This demands a different exam. Expect to pay between $20 and $140.
  • Glasses: You'll pay between $50 and $300 or more, depending on your prescription.

You'll also need cases and solution to store your contacts when they're not in your eyes. Fees can vary, but it’s not unusual to pay $200 per year to maintain your contacts.

What About Insurance?

We use insurance policies to offset the cost of medical care and keep our expenses low. While some plans help to pay for vision care, it's rare to have full coverage. And even if you do, some of your fees won't be included in your benefits package.

LASIK is not covered by insurance plans. Officials consider this an elective procedure that you could skip by wearing glasses or contacts. It's rarely, if ever, covered.

Vision insurance programs offer benefits, but they can be lean. In one typical program, you'll get coverage for:

  • Eye exams.
  • Contact lens fittings.
  • One set of contact lenses annually.

You'll have to pay out of pocket for your glasses. And this plan won't cover the cost of your solutions and maintenance materials.

Vision insurance can be helpful, but it's rare. Analysts say just 35 percent of employers offer this kind of coverage to their employees. And Medicare doesn't cover routine eye exams at all, reporters point out.

If you don't have vision insurance, you're not alone. But it means you'll pay your bill on your own, regardless of whether you choose LASIK or contact lenses.

What's the Final Tally?

 

To determine if LASIK is truly more affordable than contact lenses, we'll have to do some comprehensive math.

We know LASIK will cost, on average, $4,000 for both eyes. That's a lifetime cost, as you won't need to repeat the experience every year.

Per year, contacts will cost:

  • $100 for an exam.
  • $300 for the lenses.
  • $200 in solution.
  • $115 for glasses (since glasses cost about $350, and they last for about three years).

That brings your yearly contacts price to $715. After about five years, you'll pay more for contacts than you would for LASIK.

References

How Much Does LASIK Cost? VSP.

How Much Do Glasses Cost? How Much Do Contacts Cost? (October 2012). Clear Health Costs.

Vision Insurance FAQ: Frame, Lens, and Contact Lens Benefits. (April 2016). VSP.

What Percentage of Companies Offer Vision Insurance? (January 2017). Zenefits.

Vision Care Lags, With Blind Spots in Insurance Coverage. (May 2018). National Public Radio.

Is LASIK Expensive?

Posted on November 18, 2019

You want to see clearly without the constant use of glasses and contacts. But as you sit at the kitchen table and crunch the numbers, you wonder if you can afford LASIK surgery.

It's true that LASIK surgery can — and often does — come with a significant price tag. But when you total up costs associated with glasses and contacts, you might find that you'll save money in the long run.

High angle view of unrecognizable mature man placing USA Dollar bills into wallet.

How Much Does LASIK Cost?

LASIK is a surgical procedure. Doctors use specialized (and expensive) equipment to measure your eye and make precise cuts to reshape the surface. You need anesthesia before the cutting starts, and you need drops to help your eyes heal. All of that comes for a price.

Expect to pay about $2,200 per eye for LASIK. And that's for baseline surgery. If you're hoping to use an advanced form of the procedure — where doctors use only lasers instead of cutting your eye — experts say you should expect to pay more.

You might also see a higher cost based on:

  • Your doctor's expertise. Doctors with exceptional reputations are in high demand. They often charge more.
  • Your location. LASIK prices vary from one state to another. If you live in a spot with little LASIK surgeon competition, your rate might be higher.
  • Your aftercare. If you need a touchup surgery, and it's not covered by the original fee you paid, you'll see another bill.

Some clinics offer discounts that can bring down your total price. If you opt to pay in cash, for example, or you sign up during a slow time of year, you might see a reduction.

Woman with glasses suffering from eyestrain after long hours working on computer

How Much Do Glasses and Contacts Cost?

It's rare to walk out of an optician's office with a bill for $2,200. But your glasses and contacts can cost you more than you might think.

It's not unusual, experts say, for glasses frames to cost $500 or more. Your lens cost is tacked on, and the price can rise due to:

  • Your prescription. If you're very nearsighted, your doctor might opt to compress your lenses. That makes them lighter and easier to wear.
  • Lens coatings. Your clinic might spray materials on the outside of your lens to protect you from the sun or keep hard objects from causing scratches.
  • Bifocals. If you need additional customization to help you read, that could cost more.

An eyeglass prescription lasts for two years. Every time your eyes change, you'll need a new set of glasses. If your bill comes to $800 or more each time, that can really add up.

Contact lenses are more expensive. A box of soft contact lenses, for example, can cost about $26, experts say. You'll need a box for each eye, and they'll last you for six months. In addition to your contacts, you'll need:

  • A case. You'll use this to store your lenses when you're not wearing them. It should be replaced every time you get new lenses. And if you crack it or damage it, you'll need a new one too.
  • Cleanser. Every time you take out your contacts, you'll need to use a solution to strip proteins and bacteria from the surface. You can't run out of this product.
  • Storage solution. When you pop your lenses in a case, they'll need to swim in a liquid. This is another product you'll need in constant supply.
  • Rewetting drops. If your eyes feel dry and gritty during the day, this product can make blinking more comfortable.

All of these bottles and cases can add up to big bills every month. If you scrimp and save by buying a little less or using water instead, you could develop an eye infection. That means another trip to the doctor for help.

You Could Save Money

LASIK comes with a one-time, large medical bill. But when the surgery is complete, you might never need to buy another pair of heavy-duty, prescription glasses. That could save you thousands over the ensuing years. For many, it's a smart financial move.

References

Pros and Cons of LASIK: Are the Risks Worth the Cost? (December 2017). Michigan Health.

Are You Confused About the Cost of LASIK Eye Surgery? (March 2016). American Refractive Surgery Council.

What's It Like to Have LASIK? Patient Shares Surgery, Recovery, Cost, and More. (August 2018). Today.

How Much Do Eyeglasses Cost? Cost Helper.

How Much Do Contacts Cost? (February 2017). Bankrate.

Schedule Your
Free LASIK
Consult Today!

Take the first step toward better vision by booking an appointment and learn if Lasik is right for you.

Schedule an Exam!